• katemennie

Top Garden Birds - RSPB Big Garden Birdwatch

Updated: Jan 26


Goldfinch on a branch in the snow

Every January, the RSPB launch their ‘Big Garden Birdwatch.’ It’s a chance for everyone to take part in a citizen science project from the comfort of your sofa! Its aim is to highlight how our common garden birds are coping in our climate, and showcasing the species that are struggling and need our help.


Great Tit and Lesser Redpoll eating from feeders in the snow


Once all the data is together, it is interesting to see the common species in the UK that we find in our gardens. From 2021’s data this is the top ten from the findings:


1. House sparrow

2. Blue tit

3. Starling

4. Blackbird

5. Woodpigeon

6. Robin

7. Great tit

8. Goldfinch

9. Magpie

10. Long-tailed tit


Between the 28th-30th January this year, we encourage you to spend one hour admiring, counting and most importantly submit your garden bird sightings to the RSPB Big Garden Birdwatch.


Brambling

It is always a thrill to fill up the feeder and welcome all sorts of species to my own garden. My favourite and most popular at the moment is the colourful Goldfinch (number 8 on the 2021 list.) They are definitely the boss of the garden when they visit but the Coal Tits and Great Tits get their chance when they depart. A male Great Spotted Woodpecker is an occasion visitor that creeps in as the sun rises, and Dunnock clean up the left overs under the tree. Recently I have been welcoming some exciting winter visitors, Brambling and Redpoll. This stunning male Brambling comes in with the Chaffinch flock, and the Redpoll pop by as they fly over. I hope that when I do my own count this weekend, that these species visit. All data is important information so fill up your feeders and see what comes to yours!


Brambling

It is important for as many different areas of the UK to take part, especially in more rural locations. In my rural location in the Scottish Highlands, I can’t wait to see what the ‘top birds’ in my garden are. We will be sharing our own results over on our social media channels. Find out how you can take part in your own garden birdwatch, over on the RSPB website.


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